Whipping and Fusing

If the cut end is left un-whipped, the rope will fray or untwist, and loose strength. Whip the ends of ropes to prevent fraying and prolongs the life of the rope.


Lay twine (or dental floss) on rope to form a loop. Wrap the twine around with neat, tight bindings until the length of whipping is two to three times the diameter of the rope. Pull the working end of twine through the loop. Pull hard on the other end of the twine to draw tight under the wraps. Cut off loose ends and roll the whipping under foot.


Tape the nylon, polyester, polypropylene rope around the area to be cut. Cut in middle of the tape leaving tape intact on each side. When cutting these fibers with a pocket knife or scissors, the cut ends should be fused with a match or candle flame to prevent untwisting. Natural fiber ropes do not fuse.



Printed Materials


Square Knot

Animation of tying a Square knot


Bowline Hitch

Need to rescue someone? Throw them a bow line, which won’t ever slip or tighten. That avoids injury and gives them a secure loop to grab, step in or put their arms through. Bow lines also make great handles, again because the loop will never, ever slip. It’s also incredibly quick and simple to tie, even with cold, wet, shaking hands.

Create a loop by passing the working end of the line over the top of its body. The rabbit comes out of the hole, runs around the back of the tree, then jumps back down. Pull it tight at your desired size for the loop and you’re done. Easy.

How To Tie The Only Five Knots You'll Ever Need

Two Half Hitches

Want to tie a rope to something? This is how you do that. Use the two half hitches to tie off a tarp or hammock with a strong, quick, secure connection.

Pass the line behind the tree/pole/limb, loop it up, over the body, then through. Loop it up, over and through again and pull it tight. That’s not going anywhere.

How To Tie The Only Five Knots You'll Ever Need

Tautline Hitch

Want to tie a rope off to something, but be able to vary its length? Think tent guy line or similar. This is the easiest way to do that and the knot will hold its place on the line, so long as tension remains on it.

Bring the working end of the line over its body. Pass it behind, on the loop side. Cross that over the loop then come down over the body. Wrap it over the body and pull it through. Tighten it up and it’ll hold whatever tension you set.

As a variation, you can tie-on a separate line using the same knot, thereby adding one or more lengths of rope to another in a way that they’ll hold their place under tension, but allow you to slide that position up and down the main line.

How To Tie The Only Five Knots You'll Ever Need


Clove Hitch

Animation of tying a Clove hitch


Timber Hitch

Animation of tying a Timber hitch


Sheep Shank

Animation of tying a Sheep shank